IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

June 1 1948
IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

June 1 1948

IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

ATTHEW HALTON’S thoughtful and arresting article, “Victory for the Vatican” (page 11) is the sort of piece we think you’ll read with interest. It’s the sort of piece we ourselves always read with dazed murmurs of relief. Keeping up-todate on Europe at the relatively leisurely pace of a twice-a-month deadline is easily the hardest part of our current operations, and every time we get an article out of that unstable news theatre which manages to combine freshness with solidity we feel like lighting the incense pots.

We hope that this pleasant urge will recur several times during the next few months. As this was written two senior members of the editorial staff, Editor W. A. Irwin and Lionel Shapiro, were executing a modest pincers movement on that part of Europe which lies this side of the Iron Curtain and the first fruits thereof ought to be showing up within a month.

#Mr. Irwin went overseas in March as a member of the Canadian delegation to the United Nations’ conference on freedom of information at Geneva. At the conclusion of the conference he visited Rome, Paris, Berlin, Frankfurt, London and several way points.

Mr. Shapiro, who has been our European correspondent since 1943, arrived in London traveling east on the same day that Mr. Irwin arrived there traveling west. His movements, as usual, will be subject to amendment by the headlines, but at the last report he was hoping to make early stops in Sweden, Norway, Spain and Portugal.

$Mr. Shapiro wintered, as he did a year ago, in the greenback pastures of New York and Hollywood, where he again found himself surrounded by people whose admirable mission in life appears to he to deliver large bank notes to Mr. Shapiro in suitcase lots. In the early winter, Mr. Shapiro went to Hollywood to see a part of the filming of his first novel, “The Sealed Verdict,” for which Paramount Pictures had paid Mr. Shapiro $75,000 a year before. Mr. Shapiro remained long enough to bestow approving comments on Ray Milland and the young Czechoslovak actress, Florence Marly, who played the leading roles in the picture. Then he returned to New York and locked himself in a hotel room for six weeks.

#He emerged with a 35,000-word novelette, which was bought almost instantly by Universal-International Pictures for a reported $25,000. This story is laid in an Italian setting, is tentatively called “Paradise Lost, 1948” and will be produced by Robert Buckner, whose last production was the highly successful “Life With Father.”

Needless to say, these events make us very happy for Mr. Shapiro. They also make usJiappy for ourselves, for with only a moderate amount of trifling with the strict, pedantic truth, we are now in a position to claim that Maclean’s Magazine has the highest-paid European correspondent in the world. What’s more, we think he’s worth every penny of it.

#Christine Van Der Mark (“The Brothers,” page 14) has two vital interests—writing and the north country, in that order. The first interest she’s been able to combine with the often unenthralling business of making a living, in that she teaches Junior English at the University of Alberta. The second interest, the North, figures in most of her writing.

Miss Van Der Mark was born in Calgary (father from Holland, mother from England) but her first real meeting with the North came in a teaching assignment at Beaver Crossing, nearly 200 miles northeast of Edmonton. The country fascinated her and she made many notes—later the basis for her novel, “In Due Season,” which was published last December by Oxford Univeristy Press. She’s been in the North often since, still taking notes, and still writing about what she sees. This is her first appearance in Maclean’s.

The Editors