Maclean's MOVIES

Maclean's MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR December 15 1950
Maclean's MOVIES

Maclean's MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR December 15 1950

Maclean's MOVIES

CLYDE GILMOUR

THE BREAKING POINT: Hollywood's third go at the Hemingway novel, “To Have and Have Not." It emerges as a strong, sardonic melodrama, more honest than most in its close-ups of human relationships. John Garfield expertly portrays a harassed ex-sailor who has one wife, two children, one temptress, and many enemies.

CRISIS: A rather garrulous script does not prevent this from being, in the main, a competent and intelligent suspense story. It’s about a tropical dictator (José Ferrer) who, desperately in need of surgery, kidnaps an American brain specialist (Cary Grant) and commands him to perform the operation.

A LIFE OF HER OWN: Has to do with a glamorous Manhattan model (Lana Turner), a rich and rueful playboy (Ray Milland), and the latter's charming, crippled wife (Margaret Phillips). They are fatiguingly involved in a mixup that makes the average radio serial seem, by comparison, quite sparkling entertainment.

THE MILKMAN: This unassuming little comedy-with-music didn't cost a mintful of money to make, but its better moments offer more fun than many a lavish extravaganza. As singing and hoofing dairymen, the young Donald O'Connor and the ageless Jimmy Durante comprise a lively and likeable

NO WAY OUT: The violence of its climax is a bit too wild-eyed to sustain full belief in its sober message, but

in other respects this is one of the best (and certainly the most plainspoken) of the films attempting to explore the complex plight of the Negro in our western civilization.

THE SLEEPING CITY: After a highly promising beginning, this one degenerates into the most routine sort of cop-versus-killer mellerdrammer. Richard Conte is a detective who poses as a doctor in a hospital while trying to find out who murdered one of the real internes.

SUMMER STOCK: One of the better

musicals, largely due to the winsome singing and acting of Judy Garland as a country lass whose barn is taken over by a bunch of stage-struck screwballs. Gene Kelly's dancing is worth noting, too.

THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS: A

follow-up to “That Midnight Kiss," which I enjoyed a good deal better. Kathryn Grayson appears as an opero star, Mario Lanza as a singing fisherman. A lot of other customers seem to like this one, but to my taste it's a second-rater all the way, and the muscular Mr. Lanza a third-rate tenor.

TRIO (British): Last year's “Quartet'' was based on four of the witty and civilized short stories of W. Somerset Maugham, and this one offers three more. It's a generous second helping

GILMOUR RATES . .

All the King's Men: Drama. Excellent. Annie Get Your Gun: Musical. Good. Asphalt Jungle: Crime. Excellent.

Beaver Valley: Wildlife short. Tops. Bicycle Thief: Tragi comedy. Tops. Black Rose: Costumed drama. Poor.

Blue Lamp: Police thriller. Good. Bright Leaf: Tobacco drama. Fair. Broken Arrow: Frontier drama Good. Champagne for Caesar: Comedy. Fair. Cheaper by the Dozen: Comedy. Fair. Cinderella: Disney fantasy: Excellent. City Lights (re-issue): Comedy. Tops. Comanche Territory: Western. Good. Convicted: Prison drama. Good.

Copper Canyon: Comic western. Fair. Destination Moon: Space drama. Good. Duchess of Idaho: Musical. Fair.

Fancy Pants. Bob Hope farce Good. Father of the Bride: Comedy. Good.

50 Years Before Your Eyes: Newsreel panorama. Good.

Flame and the Arrow: Costumed swashbuckler plus acrobatics. Fair. Frightened City: Plague drama. Poor. The Furies: “Super " western. Poor Glass Mountain: Opera drama. Fair. Golden Twenties: Historical. Good. Hasty Heart: Tragi-comedy. Good Holy Year 1950: Rome pilgrimage. Fair. House by the River: Drama. Poor.

I'll Get By: Musical farce. Fair.

In a Lonely Place: Suspense Fair.

Key to the City: Gable comedy. Fair. Kind Hearts and Coronets: Comedy and murders. Excellent for adults.

Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye: Crime. Fair. Lady Without Passport: Drama. Poor. The Lawless: Suspense drama. Good. Louisa: “Gay grandma“ comedy. Fair. Love Happy: Marx Bros, farce. Fair. Mister 880: Comedy. Excellent. Morning Departure: Sea drama. Fair. My Blue Heaven: TV musical. Fair. Mystery Street: Crime. Excellent.

Night and the City: Crime drama. Good. Our Very Own: Family drama. Fair. Panic in the Streets: Crime. Excellent. Petty Girl: Comedy & music. Good. Prelude to Fame: Music drama. Good. Pretty Baby: Comedy. Fair.

Reformer and Redhead: Comedy. Fair. Reluctant Widow: Spy drama. Poor. Riding High: Turf comedy. Good. Rocketship XM: Space drama. Fair. Saddle Tramp: Western. Poor.

71 1 Ocean Drive: Crime. Fair.

Shadow on the Wall: Suspense. Fair. Spy Hunt: Espionage. Fair.

Stage Fright: Comic suspense. Good. Stars in My Crown: Old West. Fair. Stella: Screwball comedy. Fair.

Sunset Boulevard: Drama Tops.

They Were Not Divided: War. Fair. Tight Little Island: Comedy. Tops The Titan: Art documentary. Tops.

Three Came Home: Drama. Good. Treasure Island: Boy adventure Good. Twelve O'Clock High: Air war. Tops. Union Station: Kidnapping. Good. Wabash Avenue: Musical. Fair.

Wagonmaster: Western. Good.

Where the Sidewalk Ends: Dolectiv* melodrama. Fair.

Winchester '73: Good.