Mailbag

Mailbag

Is modern mother overworked? Could she stand grandma’s grind?

January 19 1957
Mailbag

Mailbag

Is modern mother overworked? Could she stand grandma’s grind?

January 19 1957

Mailbag

Is modern mother overworked? Could she stand grandma’s grind?

In your panel discussion, What About Women? (Dec. 8), one doctor made the statement that today’s mothers are overworked. What a laugh! I was raised on a farm, where my mother got up at 5.30 and helped with chores before starting breakfast. She carried wood to cook, also

water after pumping it. She made the bread, as well as churning butter. She worked in the fields and washed clothes by hand. She was happy to sit down in the evening to mend and make the children’s clothes.

Today’s woman walks out to the kit-

chen in a bathrobe, her hair in curlers and with one eye open; she turns on the electric stove, the coffee pot and the toaster. After breakfast the dishes are put in a dishwasher, the family wash in an automatic. She sits at a phone and orders soup, chops, vegetables, baked bread and

a brick of ice cream; that’s supper! Hubby gets his lunch where he works; the children in school get warm lunches. She’s busy though with teas, golf and taking life EASY.-IDA ISBERG, VANCOUVER.

• I am not married, and articles such as this make me realize how fortunate 1 am. Let Canadian women go their way trying to be men and import European women for those who want real women for WIVES.-JOHN MCNULTY, PEMBROKE, ONT.

• The following dialogue took place in our house:

Myself: 1 see a Dr. Montagu says women are superior to men.

My wife: Naturally!

My daughter Jenni: Of course ... Is Montagu a man?

Myself (looking at Dr. Montagu’s picture): I think so.

Jenni: He probably has a wife and doesn’t dare say anything else.—G. M.

SEEP,CALGARY.

• When taking part in your panel discussion the point 1 wished to make in regard to women and executive positions was this: while many women do not want the kind of executive positions held by able men they do resent the fact that their own unique contributions are not rewarded adequately in terms of status or salary. And "girl friend”—attributed to me—is a term 1 abhor! . . . ELIZABETH

LOOSLEY, TORONTO.

They all sat for Notman

When I came across the pictures of the Montreal Snowshoc Club in your William Notman photo album (Nov. 24) I went up to my attic to look at a picture of the Redcap Snowshoc Club of Halifax, N.S., taken when my father was a member of the club with two of his brothers. To my surprise it was one of W. Notman’s pictures. I remember my father saying how each photo was taken separately, then grouped. — MRS. ALISTER

MACDONALD, SYDNEY, N.S.

• This dear soul in your Notman pictures looks like the late W. L. Mackenzie King and this presents interesting possi-

bilities. Was our late leader a reincarnation of the dear lady? Was this simply a picture of Mackenzie King at a masquerade? Is there a Liberal platform under that voluminous skirt? — BARNETT

J. DANDSON, TORONTO.

• I have the same Notman photograph of Jefferson Davis and Mrs. Davis published in Maclean’s, also one of their four children taken at the same time. It was presented by Mr. Davis to my late husband’s grandfather, the Rev. William Richmond, instructor at Bishop's College, Lennoxville, Que., 1863-1869. During that period a close acquaintanceship developed between Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Richmond: they often played chess together and during one of their games they were photographed by Mr. Notman. —

EDITH I’. HIC KS. FREDERICK, MARYLAND.

• After seeing your Nov. 24 issue 1 think I'll make an album of Notman’s work. Every time 1 pick up the magazine I study those PHOTOGRAPHS.-MISS

1 ENA LINDSAY, ARDEN, ONT.

« When 1 was a boy 1 had my picture taken by Notman: my elder brother had met a tragic death in Aylmer, and my

A hoy in Aylmer . . . seventy years later.

father, realizing he had no photographs of his sons, arranged to have Notman take some. That was 1876. - H. NELLFS

ROY, TORONTO, ONT.

• What wonderful photographs! But the picture “Prince Albert Edward, future

Prince Arthur

King Edward VI1” actually is Prince Arthur, later Duke of Connaught. — C l ILFORD I*. WILSON, WINNIPEG.

• The Victorian beauty in your interesting Notman album is Miss Ethel Bond, who was the daughter ol Col. Frank Bond of Montreal and granddaughter of

Col. Bond and ... the Colonel’s daughter.

Archbishop Bond, the former Anglican primate. She married a Montreal lawyer, J. H. Dunlop, and a son, Hamilton Dunlop, lives in Montreal. Miss Bonds father, Frank Bond, also appears in an outdoor scene in your Notman album.—MRS. I. M. IT DOBELL, MONTREAL.

How a barber bolds scissors

Artist Jim Hill wasn’t too observant when he painted his cover of the Kemano barbershop (Dec. 8). The barber is holding his scissors with his thumb and index linger. 1 have been a barber for fifteen years and have never seen a barber hold scissors that way. The correct way is to hold them with the thumb and the third finger. In that way the holder uses his whole hand, ensuring a strong grip. —

\LEC LIVINGS I ON, TORONTO.

• He's the first I've seen using shears like that.—E. ORD, ESQUIMAL. I, B.C.

Artist Hill apologizes to barbers bat explains that his wife cats his hair and she holds scissors with thumb and forefinger.

What women get from college

In her argument. Women Are Not a Race Apart (Dec. 8), Anne Francis refers to a group of Calgary university grads voting that "a college education is of no value to a woman." Actually the debate was: ' Resolved that a university education for a woman is of no value.’’

The argument hinged on the facets of meaning of "value." The affirmative won. Of course, as in every debate, the arguments decided the issue, not the subject. — MRS. W. C. GUSSOW, UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S CLUB. CALGARY.

Olga—a bonus or a bust?

Would you please explain what in the name of all that's literary you mean by paying $3,000 for that mixed-up story, Olga (Dec. 8). The only conclusion I can arrive at is that you wanted to provoke

a storm of PROTEST.-MRS. L. C. JONES,

BELLEVILLE, ONT.

• It is neither clever nor funny, and is almost wholly preoccupied with sex. —

MRS. MASSY BAKER, OTTAWA.

• You didn't have to publish it as well as pay for IT.-MRS. E. KIRBY, TORONTO.

• Thank you many times for the Dec. 8 issue ... It is a feast, with what looks like a wonderful bonus in OLGA.-MARGARLE H. BUCHANAN, VANCOUVER, if