PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

April 27 1957
PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

April 27 1957

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

^ CBC-TV PLANS DAILY NEWS SPECTACULAR ^ SOME 1958 CARS WON’T HAVE SPARE TIRES ^ TRANQUILIZERS WILL TURN GRASS GREEN

PREVIEWING TELEVISION — CBC is planning a new magazine-style show for the fall to combine the best features of Newsmagazine, Graphic and Tabloid, plus some as-yet-undetermined original twist. It will probably last an hour, be partly live like Tabloid, partly filmed, like Newsmagazine, and use mobile units for “remotes” like Graphic. It won’t replace Tabloid, but may mean considerable housecleaning for the other two shows. No sponsor is yet in sight, but CBC chairman Davidson Dunton, who thought up the idea, has five planners finalizing the format.

PREVIEWING NEW PRODUCTS — New safety' tires have turned out to be

so safe that many new cars in 1958 may not have a spare. A fiat with a newly developed Goodyear tire drops the car only two inches onto an inside layer that will support the vehicle for more than a hundred miles. Chesterfields that tilt so that housewives can more easily sweep around them are being prepared for the fall furniture market... a Toronto chesterfield maker is introducing a $1,250 model trimmed with fifty yards of mink tails.

A new' thumb-saving umbrella has been designed to open and close with a light bounce off the floor . . . Perfumed paints are being developed for house walls. They’ll be available in a dozen scents including lilac, gardenia, and something called “strategy” . . . Player pianos are coming back on the crest of rock ’n’ roll. Secondhand models are in heavy demand. At least one Canadian firm is going back into the business of building new ones.

A cross-country dlal-it-yourself teletype network is being planned by CN and CP Telegraphs, for instantaneous written communication. Toronto, Montreal and Ottawa will get the first machines.

PREVIEWING JOBS — Exciting new jobs are awaiting four dozen bilingual Canadian university students who know their geography and history. They’ll be guides in the Canadian Pavilion at the World’s Fair in Brussels next year. The jobs will last half a year, pay $150 a month. More than thirty million people are expected to visit the Fair. Montreal’s police director Albert Langlois isn’t in the clear yet. His recent exoneration by the Quebec Court of Appeals will probably be contested in the Supreme Court. Even if he wins there forces backing Mayor Jean Drapeau will demand his dismissal for irregularities in which he was allegedly involved during the last election. Canadian business plans to use more and more professional actors to tell its story. Shell Oil already has six small theatrical troupes on national tours. One is a puppet show explaining the company’s services to dealers.

Almost every week, a new boom town sprouts somewhere on the Canadian map. The latest may develop into a sizable settlement, because it’s sponsored by one of the world’s largest companies: the giant U.S. Steel Corporation. The company plans to turn Shelter Bay, on the St. Lawrence River, sixty miles west ef Seven Islands, into a trans-shipment port and storage site for its Ungava iron-ore deposits.

PREVIEWING GARDENING — Harassed weekend gardeners will soon be able to turn scorched grass green between breakfast and lunch. It will be done by a new chemical compound of iron, ammonia and sulphur. As a bonus factor, -the new tranquilizer for front lawns will kill weeds . . . Familiar redclay plant pots will soon rank as antiques. Nurseries plan switching completely to asphalt paper cartons.