IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

More stories that wouldn’t stay dead

June 8 1957
IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

More stories that wouldn’t stay dead

June 8 1957

More stories that wouldn’t stay dead

IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE

We’ve commented before on the fact that magazine articles these days don't seem to be the perishable commodities they once were. Take Alan Phillips’ series on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, which was published in six issues in Maclean's in the summer of 1954. Well, Phillips’ book on the force, based on his Maclean’s series, has just been published by Little, Brown and Company here and in the U. S. and is soon to be published by Cassels in England. It’s titled The Living Legend, and it's good reading. Not only that but Crawley Films Ltd., of Ottawa, is planning a half-hour television film series about the Mounties, also sparked by the Maclean’s articles.

Which brings us to Jake and the Kid, which first saw the light of day in Maclean’s in 1942. Since that time we’ve published fifteen of these stories by W. O. Mitchell, the prairie novelist, and. of course, the radio series, adapted originally from our stories, has become an institution. Now comes word that Jake will also become a filmed television series, produced by the National Film Board of Canada, with scripts of course by Mitchell.

Two other books have grown out of Maclean’s articles since we last reported on the subject.

Bruce Hutchison’s widely read Rediscovery of the

Unknown Country, which we commissioned in 1955, will be condensed into book form and published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., of New York, and Longmans, Green, of Toronto. And material from several of Peter Newman’s lively business biographies will be included in a book scheduled for publication in 1958 by Longmans, Green.

IN THIS ISSUE: Marjorie Earl, who tells about Harry Ferguson's plans for a revolutionary new car, is a former Canadian newspaperwoman who spends most of her time free-lancing in London. She gathered material for the article in England and Canada . . . Bill Stephenson, who reports on French-Canadian television, is a former National Film Board writer-director who now freelances from Ottawa where he is in the happy position of watching TV in two languages . . .

Earle Beattie, who tells the story of the blind boss of Laura Secord chocolates, is a former journalism instructor and now works in the public-relations department of Imperial Oil, Toronto . . .

Edmund Gilligan, author of the novelette. Look

Now, Horseman, on page 21, is the well-known outdoors columnist of the N. Y. Herald-Tribune. The story reminds us a lot of Fred Bodsworth’s memorable The Last of the Curlews; again the “hero” isn't a human being but. in this case, a young stallion—and again the fine illustrations are by Duncan Macpherson. L ike Bodsworth, who’s now writing a new novel, titled The Barnacle of Bara, Gilligan is a keen naturalist.

IN THE NEXT ISSUE: Robert Coote, number two man to Rex Harrison tells why he’s leaving the Broadway hit musical My Fair Lady . . . Eric Hutton reports on the case history of a Model T that’s still in running condition; it reads like a love story . . . Alan Phillips goes back to his home town of Stratford, Ont., to find how Shakespeare has affected it . . . Hugh Garner explains with an acid wit why he’s sworn off parties . . . Frank Russell asks if science is ever going to conquer the bloodthirsty black fly and Montreal’s

Robert Ayre offers another of his funny fables. Coote