PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

June 8 1957
PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

June 8 1957

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

is Polio funds plan multi-million giveaway o Automatic cop will soon chase speeders Say good-by to The Barris Beat on television

WHO CAN USE $50 MILLION A YEAR? That’s the puzzle this continent's polio foundations are facing now that polio’s being licked by the Salk vaccine and other treatment. The March of Dimes raised more than $45 million for this year's work in the U. S. and more than a million in Canada. The U. S. Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, with 3,100 chapters, is looking for some place to put the cash. Five of the ten provincial branches in Canada have broadened their work to help all orthopedically disabled people.

PREVIEWING CAR DRIVING: New automatic cops will not only warn you if you’re going too fast; they’ll catch you if you don’t slow down. Present radar apparatus can measure car speed; a new gadget also starts a battery of flashing signs warning you to case up on the throttle. If you don’t, cameras connected to the radar will photograph your car and license for police . . . One set of traffic signs and regulations for all Canada will probably be adopted by provinces, thanks to pressure by the Canadian Highway Safety Conference. There are now five different systems in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario, the prairies and B. C.

HERE’S BAD NEWS FOR TALL PEOPLE: Furniture is getting shorter and SHORTER. It’s an Oriental influence, and it calls for dining tables 25'/2 inches off the floor and chairs about 16 inches. Other Oriental props: antique Japanese screens, which may be hung from ceiling tracks as room dividers, and a complete Oriental garden including Shangri-La court and Moongate waterfall . . . But there’s also a note of orthodoxy in the newest accent on living: the beaded curtain in the archway of grandma s living room is coming hack as a high-style feature for homes.

PREVIEWING FASHION: The rainbow's the limit in women’s unmentionables. Summer hosiery will come in pink, red, yellow and suntan; autumn in grey, brown, charcoal, rose and taupe. Lingerie and foundation garments — traditionally white or black — are flowering out in daffodil yellow, red, blue and pastel shades, to match outer garments . . . Another exotic touch: lingerie by the Queen’s dressmaker Norman Hartnell, who with twelve other top British couturiers is going into the ready-to-wear trade to help Britain in her dollar crisis.

ONE OF CANADA’S BIGGEST hook-writing jobs will soon be launched by McClelland and Stewart Ltd. It’s a two-million-word history of Canada in fourteen volumes in both French and English, covering the country’s exploration and development from the year 1000 to 1960. The editor-in-chief is Prof. W. L. Morton of the University of Manitoba history department, who does not expect to publish the first volume until 1959.

PREVIEWING TV: CBC is getting ready to drop The Barris Beat, the Saturday-night variety show emceed by newspaperman Alex Barris. It can't find a sponsor and can’t afford to carry both Barris and Wayne and Shuster, who are also unsponsored but look like better bets to the CBC . . . Fighting Words, which has never earned a nickel for the CBC, hut has been wooed by at least four hopeful sponsors in five years, may go to one of them next season. . . .General Motors is flirting with the idea of retrieving GM Theatre, the hour-long drama program it sponsored in 1955-56 but dropped last season, leaving the CBC to pay the bills to keep it alive.

LOOK FOR SCIENTISTS to expand their interest in the barnyard. Successful experiments already include the feeding of chickens with terramycin to double their egg output, and using the drug to fatten steers.

PREVIEWING WEATHER: Don’t count on getting an early suntan yet. A long-range weather forecast prepared for Maclean's by Weather Engineering Corporation of Canada, in Montreal, predicts some warm weather across Canada in the next two weeks, but it will be cool with rain and storms too. Here are the regional outlooks: Southern B. C. and western prairies—cloudy and cool, showers in B. C.; Eastern prairies—fair and cool, cloudy in second week of June; Ontario and Quebec—warm but turning cloudy and stormy on June 8 week end; Maritimes— warmer than normal, with storms on second week end.