PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

July 20 1957
PREVIEW

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

July 20 1957

PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

WHAT COMES AFTER SKIN DIVING for Canadian daredevils? Probably parachuting. It’s the current sports fad in France, and promoters there are reportedly planning a blitz on Canadian sporting-goods outlets. Price of a parachute: $250. With it goes a do-it-yourself book of instructions, including such refinements as sky diving in which you glide thousands of feet in space before pulling the cord.

WHAT’S THE SECRET OF WINTER LIVING? We re going to ask Australia’s aborigines, who wear no clothes, live outdoors all the time but get along just fine in winter temperatures near freezing. Dr. S. J. Hart of the National Research Council is on his way to the central Australian desert, where it’s winter now, to find out how they do it.

Next sport for daredevils: diving in the sky Can we learn to lick winter's cold? Cheaper Atlantic plane fares may match boats

ONE OF THE LEAST KNOWN but most influential advisers of new PM John Diefenbaker will probably be Aliister Grosart, ex-Baptist minister, Shakespearean scholar and ad-agency executive who masterminded the Conservative campaign. Grosart has resigned from McKim’s, Canada’s oldest advertising agency, to become either Diefenbaker’s personal assistant or a top man in the party’s braintrust. It’s not his first success; he managed two winning campaigns for Ontario Premier Leslie Frost. Says Grosart. realistically: "When you wind up on the winning side in a thing like this you tend to get more credit than you deserve.”

PREVIEWING AIR TRAVEL: It will soon be as cheap to fly the Atlantic as it is to go by boat. By converting planes to carry 20 percent more passengers some UK airlines say they'll cut return fares to $400. (They’re about $550 to $800 from Montreal to London return now) . . . Tiny Frobisher Bay on Baffin Island is going to become one of the world’s important airports. With Dewline almost finished, the federal department of transport takes over the base from the RCAF next fall and will enlarge it for world travel. Frobisher is about halfway between major western U. S. cities and Europe on the Great Circle route.

PREVIEWING FASHION: Clothes that wear like aluminum will soon bring the dream of The Man in the White Suit (a suit that wears forever) close to reality. Their secret: they are aluminum. Swimsuits woven with aluminum thread will retail at $35. Other offerings: shimmering ball gowns of aluminum thread woven with silk, crushable hats of ribbon crocheted with aluminum thread, handbags in textured metal anodized in any shade you want.

A LAW TO PROTECT’ FARMS from real-estate speculators is being considered by the Quebec government. As in the Niagara fruit belt, thousands of rich acres near Montreal and along the St. Lawrence Seaway are being snapped up on the chance prices will soar with housing and industrial development. Once sold, the land usually lies fallow, often for years. Quebec’s answer may be a law similar to that in homesteading, where some development must be done each year or the land goes back to the crown.

PREVIEWING WEATHER: It looks good for crops in eastern Canada, not so good in the prairies and southern B. C. Long-range forecast by the Weather Engineering Corporation of Canada for the second half of July predicts above-normal rainfall in Ontario, Quebec and Maritimes, drier and cool in the west. Regional outlook: Southern B.C. •— some storminess around July 21, otherwise dry and cool; Prairies — rain, July 18-20, turning dry and cool; Ontario, Quebec and Maritimes — rain, July 16-18. more rain about July 22 and more still around end of month.

Cool around July 23, otherwise warm.