PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

How you'll get inoculated without pain Next: the perfect conversationalist—a robot

December 19 1959
PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

How you'll get inoculated without pain Next: the perfect conversationalist—a robot

December 19 1959

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

PREVIEW

How you'll get inoculated without pain Next: the perfect conversationalist—a robot

HOW WILL YOU HAVE your egg yolk — light or dark? Canadian poultrymen will soon be able to produce egg yolks of any shade of yellow they want, by adding a new substance called carotenoids to chicken feed. Mostly it’ll he used to counteract the dark orange color that results when hens feed on green grass.

TEENAGER FOR TEENAGERS TO WATCH: Ken Fobes: They already are — by the thousands — in Calgary, where 19-year-old Fobes runs a 90minute weekly records-and-dance show on CHCT-TV called Jeans and Jims. Both Desilu and NBC arc nibbling at the program. Meanwhile Fobes, a graduate of Pasadena Playhouse, is expanding his other interests: a half-hour panel show with teenagers; song-writing; MCing an Alberta rock ’n’ roll band; writing for a local TV weekly.

CHILDREN (AND ADULTS) WHO FEAR “NEEDLES” will soon have a painless way to get their shots. Known as "jet injection,” it’s a I/5,000-in. stream fired through the skin at 280-lb. pressure from a “gun.” U. S. army researchers hit on the idea when they found workers in diesel-engine plants getting infected by tiny jets of oil bursting from high-pressure lines. Using the new injector, medics can inoculate up to 400 men an hour.

GOT A DISTINGUISHED — OR NOTORIOUS — ANCESTOR who deserves a place in the forthcoming Dictionary of Canadian Biography? It’s time to speak up. Editor George W. Brown’s already collected names of 6,000 deceased persons (even gangster Mickey MacDonald), and writing will start soon on the first of 15 to 20 volumes. The man who bequeathed $1,300,000 for the University of Toronto Press project hadn’t hoped for such an early start: the late

James Nicholson said work should begin after his widow's death. But Mrs. Nicholson got that condition changed and is encouraging immediate action.

THE DAY ISN’T FAR OFF when you’ll he able to liven a lonely evening by playing chess — or just chatting — with an electronic computer. Toronto mathematician Les Green, who’s already “taught” a U. S.-made computer to converse via written questions and answers, says there’s no reason why a voice couldn’t be dubbed in. And his colleague, Frank Anderson, an international chess master, has a chess-playing machine that’s beaten all comers so far — including Anderson. Another possibility, says Anderson: a hand-sized computer to make some of your business and personal decisions.

CANADA’S NEWEST professional sculptor should have a better grasp of the market for his work than most of his competitors. He’s Alan Jarvis, for four years (till he quit this fall) director of the National Gallery in Ottawa. Now he divides his time between editing Canadian Art and working on stone in a small downtown Ottawa studio. Subjects? All Jarvis will say is “some very w'ellknown Canadians.”

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS may some day be able to earn a BA in the operation and philosophy of prairie co-operatives. That’s the aim of E. F. Scharf and board chairman L. L. Lloyd, of Saskatoon’s Co-operative Institute. They’re leading the drive toward the first step: construction —probably beginning next spring—of a $250,000 Western Co-operative College, at Saskatoon. They hope for eventual affiliation with the University of Saskatchewan.