Mailbag

“Mob hysteria" about football? What about hockey? How the north brings out the ham in us all Who's more dangerous—Lady Chatterley or Elsie?

December 19 1959

Mailbag

“Mob hysteria" about football? What about hockey? How the north brings out the ham in us all Who's more dangerous—Lady Chatterley or Elsie?

December 19 1959

Mailbag

“Mob hysteria" about football? What about hockey? How the north brings out the ham in us all Who's more dangerous—Lady Chatterley or Elsie?

CONGRATULATIONS to Frank Fredrickson (The Grey Cup — and football — are strictly for the birds, Nov. 21)... Most people go to the games because they think it is the right thing to do. Like some go to the opera who could not tell the difference between Annie Laurie and Aida. I put a stopwatch on one game I went to see and found that the time taken for actual combat from snap to completion was 3Vi minutes a quarter or 14 minutes a full GAME.-GEORGE CROOKSTON, HANEY, u.c.

* Mob hysteria, hah! Even if it is so, football isn't the only sport. 1 suppose Fredrickson has never seen a hockey game in Montreal or is ignoring the facts. What about the hoodlumism during Chicago hockey games and what happened to Red STOREY?-M. MUNRO,

MONTREAL.

^ I wholeheartedly agree with everything Fredrickson has said about what has happened to the game of Canadian football: and more important still, what has happened to the football fans.— MRS. HAROLD W. FULLERTON, VANCOUVER.

»" Fredrickson's views should be shared by thinking Canadians. The idolatry of fans for football players, the ludicrous over-publicity, the mass hysteria with its concomitant mob violence and drinking, the play on civic loyalty, the

constant striving for “big time” promotion and the insatiable desire for victory with or without honor, all must be seen to be BELIEVED.-G. NEVILLE

MUNRO, VANCOUVER.

* Articles like this may stage the comeback for conversations that don't begin with “DIDJASEETHEGAME?”-MRS.

\V. HICKS, EDMONTON.

*■* Fredrickson discussing the Grey Cup reads like the field secretary's report of the Bruce County Cold Water Drinking Society. His prejudices seem less directed against the game of football than against the fact that some of the fans DRINK! What if we do have one day of emotional orgy a year? We are inclined to be rather Drearyville the other 364.-THOMAS JOYCE, OTTAWA.

“True north strong and free”

Despite Peter Newman's conclusion (What we are really doing in the north, Nov. 7 ) that the north will remain an "endless land . . . always to stare in futile emptiness at the stars.” I was charmed to see that he had fallen into the same pit of semi-conscious romanticism that traps us all. This is evidenced by the photo of the parkaclad, pipe - clenching, distance - gazing

writer that heads his article. The north brings out the ham and cowboy in us all.-HARRY BOYLE, EDITOR, WHITE-

HORSE STAR, YUKON.

Religion in the 60s

Having just read your Preview of the 1960s, (Nov. 7) I regret to find you have omitted to comment on the greatest influence on any country — religion . .. Perhaps you could tell us why you cater to materialism and ignore the spiritual needs of the people which when offered and accepted makes a country truly great.—c. A. SADLER, OSHAWA, ONT.

The great influence of religion i.s, of course, admitted hut Preview's reporters didn't spot any significant changes coming up.

In defense of censorship

After reading your very silly editorial of Nov. 21 (If we burn Lady Chatterley. why not the Bobbsey Twins?). I think you would do well to swear off writing about censorship. Fifty years ago when the Alger and Elsie books were popular, teen-age delinquency was unheard of and unwed mothers few and far between. Books in those days had no filth for young people to read, so how can you suggest they corrupted or led astray any young PEOPLE?-A.

SCHILZ, PORT DOVER, ONT.

* You wrote: “We have been trying to swear off writing editorials about censorship” . . . Please do not. Our present censorship methods are obviously ridiculous. At the moment we are having one of our perennial book - burning drives at local newsstands, and if the “crusaders” have their way I'm afraid even Maclean's will be taken off the SHELVES.-ARCHIE WALKER, SYDNEY, N.S.

* Three cheers. The Bobbsey Twins were after my time and I didn't read many Alger books but I have long thought that the Elsie books were the only books I ever read which really did me harm. I am with you in not wanting to burn any books—good, bad or INDIFFERENT.-MISS FREDA F. WALDON,

HAMILTON, ONT. -fc