Parade

Parade

The milk box of human kindness

December 19 1959
Parade

Parade

The milk box of human kindness

December 19 1959

Parade

The milk box of human kindness

As Christmas 1959 approaches, Parade has a variety of good wishes for some folks who did well last Christmas (may they do just as well) and some who didn't do so well (may the clouds break this year). For instance, we hope for a real handsome and healthy Christmas tree for a Winnipeg family that had to settle for an eighteen-inch artificial tree last year when father got disgusted at the price being charged for the scrawny miserable things on the lots. The sixyear-old son of the house was desolate and unconsolable, wailing, “Santa won’t even know what that thing is!" Only father’s ingenuity mollified son and solved Santa’s problem, when on Christmas Eve the house broke out in a rash

of crayoned signs posted by front door, back door and fireplace, reading: “This way to our Christmas tree.” And right in front of the tiny imitation a larger sign shouted in bold red letters: "THIS is our Christmas tree."

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We trust that the head of one house in Stoney Creek, Ont., will find it in his heart to be as generous to the milkman this Christmas as he was last. He didn't know he'd been a good fellow at all until he encountered the milkman a couple of days after the holiday and was greeted out of the side of the milkman's mouth. "Thanks for the gift, mister, I really enjoyed it." The householder assumed his wife had made some kindly gesture hut she was as puzzled as he. It was some time before he found out that a business friend had stopped by Christmas Eve when everyone was out and popped a gift bottle of whisky in the milkbox.

* * *

We hope that a certain young man in Ottawa will know how to look after himseIf as well this year as he did last Christmas. During the family gift-opening ceremonies one present turned up with a nameless tag, so it was set aside until everything else had been opened hoping some kind donor might remember it. In mid-tree, so to speak, the gift vanished along with the small boy. who was found in the kitchen painstakingly trying to print his name on the tag.

A year ago now a grade-seven class in Toronto was asked to write a letter, complete with addressed envelope, as an exercise in composition. After the letters had been handed in. marked and returned. Jean took hers home to show her family; but then as children will she set it down somewhere and forgot about it. At least she did until mid-evening of December 26 when the family received a phone call from her aunt in Flora, worried sick because Jean hadn't arrived on the evening train to spend the holidays as she'd said she would in that nice letter the child wrote just before Christmas. For Jean, we hope she gets there this year even if she has to invite herself again.

* * *

A head start on Christmas baking is a good idea if you are as ambitious a cook as a woman in Ancaster, Ont., but storage is a problem. Having filled every available jar and tin and her neighbors’ freezers, she still had one last batch of cookies to tuck away till December 25. Finally a frantic search turned up one forgotten tin hidden away at the back of a cupboard, but inside was a forgotten batch of Christmas cookies — last Christmas cookies.

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Some people really do their Christmas shopping early. From Winnipeg comes a report of a poor fellow so laden down with parcels that when he came to flag

a down elevator in Eaton's, which has a bank of the new push-button kind, he didn't have a free finger left. He crouched down carefully and pushed the button with his nose.

* * *

The early shopper we've heard about in Alexandria. Ont., was doing his in the liquor store. On the counter he spied a jar and a sign, soliciting donations for the Lions Club Christmas Basket Fund for needy families. “Say.” he addressed the vendor, "put my name xiown for a basket, willya?” And as the clerk gawked he gathered up his five bottles of wine and departed.

PVRADF. PAYS $5 to $10 for true, humorous anecdotes reflecting the current Canadian scene. No contributions can be returned.

Address Parade, c/o Maclean’s Magazine, 481 University Avenue, Toronto 2, Ontario.