PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

Who’s going out of the social register Cent-a-mile electric cars soon on market

March 28 1959
PREVIEW

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

Who’s going out of the social register Cent-a-mile electric cars soon on market

March 28 1959

A LOOK AT TOMORROW IN TERMS OF TODAY

PREVIEW

Who’s going out of the social register Cent-a-mile electric cars soon on market

OUR CONTROVERSIAL SOCIAL REGISTER will be down to 30,000 (from 50,000) names when it comes off the presses this fall. Who’s going out? Among others: MPs mixed up in the Ottawa Printing Bureau (“or any other”) scandal; MLAs with no other qualifications (“no more carte blanche”) and the “wife” of a priest in a Northern Ontario town where the arbiter put Mr. and Mrs. before everybody. Also going out are five Quebec City socialites who made the book although they were dead. Going in is External Affairs Minister Sidney Smith. The publishers admit 500 errors in the first edition. Most goofed city: Victoria.

HEIR APPARENT to the first family of Canada’s English-language theatre and a young man to watch is William Davis, cousin of Murray and Donald (founders of Toronto’s Crest theatre) and their sister actress Barbara Chilcott. Just graduating from University of Toronto (he was honored for four

years’ “outstanding contribution to college theatre”) Davis makes his professional acting debut this month. He’d rather direct, has already co-produced a successful summer season at Port Carling, Ont. This year he’ll also help run a theatre in Peterborough. Toronto Globe and Mail critic Herbert Whittaker calls him, at 21, “a first-class director.”

TWO FAVORITE CANADIAN CHILDREN’S HEROES are off to seek further fame in the U. S. They’re Dale of the Mounted, veteran of nine books, and Maggie Muggins, star of radio and three books. Dale’s creator is Toronto writer and former Don Jail guard Joe Holliday; Maggie’s is Mary Grannan—CBC’s Just Mary. Thomas Allen has published all twelve books in Canada; Pennington Press of Chicago has U. S. rights. Advance ballyhoo will include billboard and TV ads.

UMBRELLAS FOR MEN are in style again. Fad started in Vancouver where UBC undergrads began packing them between lectures. Now it’s spreading east. Some commuters pair tightly furled bumbershoots with bowlers. “Our sales are up 500%,” Murray Sibulash of Atlas Umbrellas told Maclean’s. Men’s styles start at $4, go as high as $19.95 for nylon with sterling handle-ring. One fashion that didn’t make it: colored tops.

ELECTRIC CARS may be on their way back. Two U. S. firms sold 50 each last year. Stinson Aircraft Tool of San Diego, Calif., has converted sporty Karmann-Ghias to run 80 miles (at up to 60 mph) on one battery charge. Cleveland Vehicle Co. will soon bring out an electric Nash Rambler at less than $2,500. Advantages: one-cent-a-mile costs, silence, no fumes, easy maintenance. Drawbacks: frequent recharging; heavy batteries.

BRITISH FILM-STAR LESLIE HOWARD (Pygmalion, The Scarlet Pimpernel), killed in an airplane crash in 1943, will be back in the news again this spring when his biography is published simultaneously in Canada, Britain (Longmans Green) and the U. S. (Harcourt Brace). Author: Toronto socialite Mrs. Robert DaleHarris, née Leslie Ruth Howard. Title: A Quite Remarkable Father. Mrs. Dale-Harris left Britain 12 years ago with her Montreal-born husband, didn’t find time for the book till last year, when a broken hip (riding) slowed her down. Her three children have never seen Howard on the late show; the Dale-Harris’ TV set is kept in the maid’s quarters.

BILINGUAL GROUPS AND CONVENTIONS will soon be able to have speeches translated simultaneously without a maze of wires and microphones. A British hearing-aid firm, Multi-Tone Ltd., with offices in Toronto, will rent pocket-sized transistor sets to pick up signals sent through a single wire loop around the auditorium. First practical test will be next month when doctors of the College of GPs meet at Toronto’s Royal York Hotel.