May 15, 1951

THE WHITE PAGAN 1011
FICTION

THE WHITE PAGAN

FROM HIS trolling chair Jack Howard saw the atoll appear off the port bow—just a green smudge on the horizon at first, then, as the yacht neared it, a clump of coconut trees rooted in a strand of white sand encircling a blue lagoon. When the loom set in the palms seemed to spring in the air and the sand to dissolve in shimmering mirage.
Why wives are going out to work 67
Articles

Why wives are going out to work

A REVOLUTION has quietly taken place in Canada during the past eleven years. In 1939 there were about 666,000 women in the Canadian labor force. During World War Two women streamed into office and factory jobs until this figure was swollen to 1,200,000. Most people expected the women would quietly go back to their homes when the peace came.
WE FOUND THE LAST WILD WEST 1819
Articles

WE FOUND THE LAST WILD WEST

BEFORE Andy Holte headed back to his ranch at Anahim Lake he gave us some advice which we later wished we’d followed. “You kids are pullin’ north into a country so far back . and so hard to get at that ya don’t have to make but a few of the same mistakes I made, and you won’t come out,” Andy said.
MILK RUN TO KOREA 2021
Articles

MILK RUN TO KOREA

A LITTLE more than a month ago a young RCAF flying officer named Dean Broadfoot checked into the Marunouchi Hotel in Tokyo. Broadfoot, who had just arrived from the Aleutian Islands, spotted an acquaintance in the lobby. “Where you been?” he asked.
The Fight to Keep the Wilderness Wild 1213
Articles

The Fight to Keep the Wilderness Wild

LAST August a millionaire manufacturer and family from Wichita, Kan., drove into the backwoods hamlet of Winton in northern Minnesota, unloaded several battered packsacks into canoes, and sent their chauffeur and Cadillac home. Then they disappeared for a month in the rugged and picturesque lakeland of northwestern Ontario’s Quetico Provincial Park, a hop skip across the border.
THE TOUGHEST MAN AFLOAT 2223
Articles

THE TOUGHEST MAN AFLOAT

IF ONE man personifies the ups and downs of Canadian shipping since the turn of the century he is fifty-seven-year-old Fred White, hosun of the Canuk Line freighter Triberg. This gangling, tattooed, hunch-shouldered shellback with the face of a Breton priest; this restless, improvident, God-fearing Newfoundlander with more lives than a cat; this character clipped clean out of Conrad believes he has sailed deep seas longer than any other Canadian.
WHY UNCLE SAM HAS BLOCKED THE SEAWAY 1617
Articles

WHY UNCLE SAM HAS BLOCKED THE SEAWAY

IF THE United States Congress is ever going to ratify the 1941 St. Lawrence Seaway Agreement it will do so this year. If not, and chances look none too good, Canada might as well start the job alone. It’s worth doing. It will bring 2.3 million horsepower of cheap electricity to Ontario and Quebec —the last major source of power still undeveloped in central Canada.
Everybody's Playing the Market Again 1415
Articles

Everybody's Playing the Market Again

IN A SINGLE MORNING last December a Toronto broker was asked to invest on the stock market the savings of three persons who had never owned a share of stock before. From Honeymoon Bay, B.C., a fisherman offered to send nine hundred dollars as soon as the broker had a stock he was sure would be a good buy.
They Say You Taste Like Pork 2627
Articles

They Say You Taste Like Pork

IN THE cultured decade of mid-20th-century civilization just ended, the world probably witnessed more cannibalism than in the previous 100 years. And the cannibals? Not many were spear-brandishing blacks in the rain forests of Africa.
The Housing Outlook Grows Blacker 45
BACKSTAGE AT OTTAWA

The Housing Outlook Grows Blacker

CANADA is running into a major crisis in housing this year. With the need for new homes as great as ever, and 150,000 immigrants coming to make it worse, the building program has taken a nosedive. The Government is baffled to know what to do about it, because Government policy created the crisis.
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