November 14, 1977

Interview

Closeup/Politics

Quebec: end of Year One

Interview 45

Interview

What does an internationally renowned, 51-year-old novelist worry about when he’s 3,000 miles from home, promoting a new book in North America? Wearing his fingers to the bone autographing copies for students? Not being late for that literary luncheon?

Letters 1415

Letters

The Horner of a dilemma

Quebec: end of Year One 3031

Closeup/Politics

Quebec: end of Year One

A report on the state of a nation-in-progress

Our Lady of the Causes m2m3

Closeup/Politics

Our Lady of the Causes

Who’s afraid of Simma Holt? Nearly everybody

The artist struggles on m16m16a

Closeup/Dance

The artist struggles on

Arnold Spohr made Winnipeg famous. It didn’t reciprocate

A life of trials 5859

Closeup/Show Business

A life of trials

Raymond Burr in 'The Case Of The Unsmiling Buddha’

A nation of murders m3249

Closeup/International Affairs

A nation of murders

The Terror is alive and well and in South Africa

The gang that couldn’t spook straight 2021

Canada

The gang that couldn’t spook straight

Not since the Rivard and Munsinger scandals of the mid-Sixties had there been such an uproar in parliament. The newly installed TV cameras had arrived just in time to spice daily newscasts with scenes from the House of Commons of allegations and smears, cat-calls and jeers, special debates and little sideshows related to one dominant theme: What have the Royal Canadian Mounted Police been up to and who is responsible?

The expendable Canadians 7475

Business

The expendable Canadians

It had been growing ominously evident for months. Mother Inco, as Sudbury miners call the world’s largest nickel producer, was in serious trouble. The days had long passed when the giant multinational pulled all the strings in the nickel market, when Canada exported 95% of the free world’s nickel and Inco took the usual business cycle—four good years, one lean—easily in stride.

Joseph Clark, Superstar 2627

Canada

Joseph Clark, Superstar

In the first few days of the new parliamentary session, under the close scrutiny of television, Joe Clark underwent a subtle transformation. Most visible was the disappearance of his old, untamed, countrystyle haircut that looked as if he’d just stuck his finger in a socket.

October 311977 November 281977