Shots and Angles

Shots and Angles

The Bride Wore Red

ANN ROSS December 1 1937
Shots and Angles

Shots and Angles

The Bride Wore Red

ANN ROSS December 1 1937

Shots and Angles

The Bride Wore Red

ANN ROSS

THE FACT that “The Bride Wore Red” is set in the Tyrol doesn’t distinguish it greatly from other Joan Crawford pictures, where the setting is usually Park Avenue, New York. Whether she’s a Manhattan debutante or a Cinderella from a waterfront dive in Trieste. Joan’s problem is always the same—she has to get herself married to one of two dazzling screen heroes. In “The Bride Wore Red” she travels from the Trieste café to a swagger hotel in theTyrol. where for a fortnight she proposes to live like a lady. En route she meets an Alpine postmaster (Franchot Tone), possessor of little more than a donkey-cart and a fancy line of conversation. At the hotel she encounters a rich youth (Robert Young), owner of a yacht and a more-than-fancy bank account.

Though attracted to Hero No. 1, Joan pursues Hero No. 2 with all the famous Crawford energy and allure. True love wins out in the end. however, and she goes off to wred her village postman. Altogether, Crawford admirers won’t find anything missing from Joan’s latest picture. Children aren’t likely to be interested. They may even be slightly alarmed by the new and intensified Crawford make-up.

Wife, Doctor and Nurse

WARNER BAXTER, in “Wife, Doctor and Nurse,” is presented as a city surgeon, very successful with his profession and feminine patients. In spite of his wide practice however, he admits to his favorite barman that women are a mystery to him. He can take them apart and put them together, but doesn’t know what makes them tick. What makes his wife (Loretta Young) and his nurse (Virginia Bruce) tick, of course, is their love for Dr. Baxter.

Both try running away, only to discover they can’t tick without him.

The hero’s problem is even more complex—he can’t tick without both of them. So they arrive at a modem compromise, the ladies agreeing to pool their claims; and everything ends happily, with every prospect of more trouble to follow. “Wife, Doctor and Nurse, ” though it arrives rather late in the field, is a good deal more entertaining than most pictures of its kind. It’s brightly handled, vivaciously acted, and most adults will enjoy it. Children will probably think it extremely silly.

Victoria the Great

X7ICTORIA THE GREAT” is the sort * of picture the English studios alone seem competent to produce—a historical film that conveys not only the detail but the living spirit of the past. This is the life story of Victoria from the time of her ascension to the English throne. On the biographical side, it is handled with a mixture of reverence and affection. On the historical side, it seems to be as authoritative as a State document. And it’s all managed with wonderful dexterity, both dramatic and cinematic, so that you are being handsomely entertained all the time your knowledge of the past is being steadily improved.

Anna Neagle as Victoria and Anton Walbrook as the Prince Consort both give fine characterizations, sensitive, sympathetic and believable. Everything in this picture is of unsurpassed quality. The musical background is furnished by the London Symphony orchestra. The “sets” are Windsor, Balmoral and Buckingham Palace—the real locale of history and not a cardboard imitation. Altogether this is one of the best historical films ever shown, and shouldn’t be missed by anyone.