THE SCRAPBOOK

THE SCRAPBOOK

Crystal Floats from Japan

December 1 1937
THE SCRAPBOOK

THE SCRAPBOOK

Crystal Floats from Japan

December 1 1937

THE SCRAPBOOK

Crystal Floats from Japan

VISITORS to the Pacific Coast evince keen interest in the glass floats that find their way across the ocean from the fishing grounds of Japan. These hollow crystal spheres of great buoyancy are used by Japanese fishermen to float their nets, instead of the cork or wood type of float commonly used in deep-sea fishing. Many break away and are carried to the shores of British Columbia or Northern Oregon by the ocean drift from japan, which travels at the rate of thirteen miles a day, requiring twenty months to cover a distance of 8,000 miles.

Most of the specimens are spherical in shape and vary from the size of an orange to eighteen inches in diameter. The large float is deep blue in color and was found on a sand spit in a remote cove on the Queen Charlotte Islands. In color they vary from perfectly clear glass through many shades of blue and green, according to exposure to sunlight. Collectors prize them. — Mrs. M. E. McVicker, Victoria, B.C.

British Royalty Buried in Canada

UNKNOWN to most Canadians, a member of a British royal family is buried in D>ndon, Ontario.

In 1867, when London was a garrison town, Charles Wetherbee, an officer in the Imperial Army, was on duty there. He had brought with him on a date which the records do not disclose, his wife, Lavinia Hermione Gertrude Amanda Guelph, daughter of King George IV of England. Biographers throw little light on Princess Lavinia, but we know that she found her last resting place in Ixrndon, seventy years ago.

The picture shows a visitor to Mount Pleasant Cemetery deciphering the lettering on the weatherbeaten tombstone, which reads: “To the memory of Lavinia Hermione Gertrude Amanda Guelph, daughter of George IV and wife of Charles Wetherbee. Died January 25, 1867. age -16 years.”—R. J. Stuart, D>ndon, Ont.

North America’s Oldest Horse

THIS RECORD is claimed for Dolly, forty years old. owned by Walter Carruthers, of Wingham. Ont.

In 1907 Mr. Carruthers. who was a carpenter, suffered a twenty-foot fall, and a doctor told him he would never walk again. He bought Dolly, then ten years old, and had a buggy specially adapted so that he could sit in it and drive her three miles from his home to Wingham. With the exception of a few subzero days, or when the road was impassable with snow, he has made the trip daily with Dolly ever since.

During these thirty years Dolly has been fed in the stable the year round. She will obey traffic regulations, stopping without any prompting at all stop signs. Whenever Mr. Carruthers hails a friend on the street, she will pull over to the curb without being told. Harry J. Boyle, W ingham, Ont.