My most memorable meal: No. 18

Chowder to Cheddar at ’Quoddy

Dr. Charles H. Best March 30 1957
My most memorable meal: No. 18

Chowder to Cheddar at ’Quoddy

Dr. Charles H. Best March 30 1957

Chowder to Cheddar at ’Quoddy

My most memorable meal

No. 18

Dr. Charles H. Best

tells about

I have eaten delicious and unusual meals in many parts of the world, but outstanding among them is a special one I have eaten many times in an atmosphere that is always memorable.

The meal I am about to describe is eaten on the beach of Passamaquoddy Bay at half tide, on a clear, late September evening beside a towering driftwood bonfire. On such occasions we usually start with clams, which we have dug earlier in the day, at low tide. These are steamed in seaweed and, to our family, it would be difficult to imagine anything more delicious as an hors d’œuvre than these small clams eaten with melted butter and vinegar — about two dozen per person.

The clams are followed by a steaming fish chowder (which I modestly claim as my own special-

ty). This is made with fresh haddock fillets from the bay. potatoes, onions, a little salt pork (these are usually combined the night before) and milk which is added just before serving. Just short of the boil, the chowder is served in bowls to each of which a little butter has been added. Pilot biscuits may be passed around—but the chowder is a meal in itself.

Even so. we usually look forward to the green-apple pie (made by a family expert) topped with a piece of old Canadian Cheddar which is our next course.

The coffee is always made in open kettles over the fire and we are glad to sink back with our pottery mugs full to the brim with a satisfying brew to which salt spray and bits of charred driftwood have added a wonderful but indescribable flavor.

DR. CHARLES BEST IS THE CO-DISCOVERER OF INSULIN.